Nashville Weekend Travel Guide

Collage showing pictures of Nashville.

When I was over in Florida, I decided that it would be a good idea to squeeze a two day trip to Nashville. I have wanted to visit the home of country music since the famous show Nashville and knew this would be one of the only chances in a while for me.

Where I stayed

I stayed in this apartment in this block of flats. It reminded me of an AirBNB but we booked through booking.com. It was about a fifteen minute walk away from Lower Broadway (where the Honkey Tonks are) so was ideal. We wasn’t really looking for an apartment, it was just the cheapest option. The way the decor was set out was really cute and felt very ‘Nashville’.

Image showing a bed in an apartment in Nashville.
Bathroom sink in Nashville.

What I did

The first thing on my list was visiting the Honky Tonk strip on Lower Broadway. The Honky Tonks have music blasting out pretty much every evening. Even on a Sunday where we went, pretty much every bar was open even though it was December and freezing. I went to Robert’s Western World (the Honkey Tonk with the red boot out front), which I wanted to go too after seeing the bar on Pinterest.

Image of a band playing in Robert's Western World, Nashville.

I went on a Sunday where they had a live band playing covers. The food, was reasonably priced, which I was surprised about as I thought being in an tourist area, the prices will stack up and the atmosphere was great.

Jacks Bar-B-Que sign outside the bar in Nashville.
Image of the Honkey Tonks in Nashville.

John Seigenthaler Pedestrian Bridge

Afterwards we headed towards the John Seigenthaler Pedestrian Bridge. It is a famous bridge in Nashville that is on all of the Music City promo. You don’t get a great view of the Nashville skyline that I thought you would at night. Mainly because the bridge wasn’t high up. But considering myself and James were turned away from the Honkey Tonks because James had a rucksack with him as he keeps the DSLR camera in it. Probably short sighted of us because usually if you brought a bag in a club in the UK you would leave it in the cloak room of the club. But they didn’t have cloak rooms here so we were not admitted. So keep that in mind.

Image of the Nashville cityscape at night.
The John Seigenthaler Pedestrian Bridge at night.

Johnny Cash Museum

Saturday was crazy busy with my time being filled with going to the Ryman Auditorium, Grand Ole Opry and the Jonny Cash Museum. The Johnny Cash Museum (situated just off Lower Broadway) was the first stop and it was even better then I imagined. It had so much Johnny Cash stuff from vinyls to clothing to grammy awards… I was amazed about how much Johnny Cash accomplished in his life, the Walk the Line movie didn’t do him enough justice! For $20 it was reasonably priced and a must see for Johnny Cash and country music lovers.

Guitar and speaker in the Johnny Cash Museum.
Johnny Cash poster.

Image of the GooGoo shop in Nashville.

Across the street from the Johnny Cash Museum is the GooGoo shop. GooGoo’s were first created in Nashville in 1912 and is famous because it is thought to be considered the first combinational chocolate bar. The bar contains marshmallow nougat, caramel, roasted peanuts covered with chocolate. I found out about GooGoo’s on Pinterest, when I was looking for places to eat in Nashville so naturally I had to find one to try.

Ryman Auditorium

Ryman Auditorium Stage.

After the museum I headed off to the Ryman Auditorium. The Ryman Auditorium has a fascinating history, because the history is so fascinating, I have provided a brief outline below but visit the Ryman site for more detail.

The Ryman started life out as a church created by Thomas Ryman, a prominent businessman in Nashville. The church was originally called the Union Gospel Tabernacle but when Thomas died, the church was renamed in his honour. In the 1920’s Lula Naff, a Nashville Show Promotor, leased the building and ran events for the place which as the place grew in popularity attracted many famous performers such as Katharine Hepburn.

The Grand Ole Opry which was then a radio show was broadcast live from the Ryman from 1943 until the show outgrew the building and moved into its current home in 1970. Due to losing The Grand Ole Opry, The Ryman went into disrepair and in 1990 was facing demolition but eventually the community orchestrated to save it. Today as well as a museum it still serves as a music venue.

I originally brought the ticket just because it was a package deal and I really under appreciated how important the Ryman’s contribution to the musical fabric of Nashville. The tour was self guided, which I was fine with with lots of exhibits going through the performers at The Ryman.

In the afternoon we made our way over to The Grand Ole Opry stopping at the Gaylord Hotel first. The hotel includes boutique shops all within what is essentially a greenhouse full of plants and water features.

Gaylord Hotel.

I wasn’t feeling my best that day, so wasn’t sure if it was that but I was disappointed with the hotel. I thought it would have a lot more shops inside. But it was essentially just walking in a big greenhouse.

Image of the inside of the Gaylord Hotel.

Grand Ole Opry

Image of the inside of the Grand Ole Opry.

The Grand Ole Opry is the home of country music and arguably the most famous music venue in Tennessee. A little bit of history about the Grand Ole Opry, it started out as a radio station called the WSM Barn Dance on the fith floor of the National Life and Accident Company. As audiences for the live show increased, the show outgrew its studios and moved to various places (one of them being the Ryman as I mentioned earlier) before moving to its current venue today.

We were lucky enough that we visited during the season where the Opry shows are performed over at the Ryman (during the winter months the Grand Ole Opry shows move over to the Ryman). Which meant we were able to go to the backstage and see the dressing rooms. The tour covers in general the star entrance to the Opry, and going on the stage and walk around the venue. The tour was around forty minutes long – which doesn’t seem long but it was long enough and very informative.

The Listening Cafe

We couldn’t get tickets for The Bluebird Cafe, which was one place that we really wanted to go to. Instead for the evening, my partner got tickets for The Listening Cafe and their Song Suffragettes night.

I am so glad he got the tickets, the aim of the Song Suffragettes is to let new, upcoming female singer song writers in Nashville play. It seems to have stemmed from a Bill Board article on their website which says just three of the top 25 artists on the Bill Board Country music chart was women and they want to play a part in creating opportunities to change this. We had a lovely evening listening to some very talented ladies: Hannah Bethel, Molly Brown and Jenna Paulette. The food I found was really good and reasonably priced as well. I didn’t like the selection of alcoholic drinks. I do prefer fruit ciders and cocktails but Nashville is a place you really go for beers, I found.

Singers with their guitars on stage at The Listening Room Cafe.

Capitol Hill and Victory Park

Outside bell.

On our last morning before the airport beckoned us back to Orlando. My partner and I decided to go for a run. We love running and I do feel running on holiday is a great way to see places that you may not see on the usual tourist routes. I ran a lovely little route which covered Capitol Hill and Victory Park.

Bridge.

So that is what I did in Nashville. Have you been to Nashville? Are there any places you would recommend?

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