Book that I hated

I love reading books and spend a small fortune in Amazon and charity shops purchasing books. However some books I have purchased often end up being real disappointments. Since I take my unwanted books to the charity shop, I delved back in my amazon purchases to see which books ended up being disappointments.

Contest – Matthew Reilly

Synopsis: The New York State Library becomes an arena for Dr Stephen Swain and daughter Holly where Dr Stephen Swain is competing for his life. 

I loved Ice Station and Hell Island so when I was looking for a book to take with me on holiday Contest seemed like the perfect answer. Matthew Reilly’s books are know for being over exaggerating. Ice Station and Hell Island are two but they were kind of believable, Contest was just so ridiculous from the start with. As soon as I was reading about alien creatures that speak to humans, I just couldn’t read the rest of the book. If you are into fantasy it may be one for you.

The Fair Fight – Anna Freeman

Synopsis (from Amazon): Born into a brothel, Ruth’s future looks bleak until she catches the eye of Mr. Dryer. A rich Bristol merchant and enthusiast of the ring, he trains gutsy Ruth as a puglist. Soon she rules the blood-spattered sawdust at the infamous Hatchet Inn.

The Fair Fight will take you from a filthy brothel to the finest houses in the town, from the world of street-fighters to the world of champions. Alive with the smells and the sounds of the streets, it is a raucous, intoxicating tale of courage, reinvention and fighting your way to the top.

A historical fictional novel about female boxers really appealed to me as I read a five star review about it in an magazine. But the book was just such a slow burner that I got fed up and gave up half way through. I found it confusing and didn’t want to spend the time finding out what was going on.

Generation X: Tales for an accelerated culture – Douglas Coupland

Synopsis (from Amazon): Andy, Dag and Claire have been handed a society beyond their means. Twentysomethings, brought up with divorce, Watergate and Three Mile Island, and scarred by the 80s fallout of yuppies, recession, crack and Ronald Reagan, they represent the new generation- Generation X. 
Fiercely suspicious of being lumped together as an advertiser’s target market, they have quit dreary careers and cut themselves adrift in the California desert. Unsure of their futures, they immerse themselves in a regime of heavy drinking and working in no future McJobs in the service industry.
Underemployed, overeducated and intensely private and unpredictable, they have nowhere to direct their anger, no one to assuage their fears, and no culture to replace their anomie. So they tell stories: disturbingly funny tales that reveal their barricaded inner world. A world populated with dead TV shows, ‘Elvis moments’ and semi-disposible Swedish furniture.

For those of you reading that know me personally, this does sound like a book that would be right up my street, especially its relevance with today’s society. I found it a choir to get through, quite self indulgent and boring.

Kill All Enemies – Melvin Burgess

Synopsis (from Amazon): 

Everyone says fourteen-year-old BILLIE is nothing but trouble. A fighter. A danger to her family and friends.
But her care worker sees someone different.

Her classmate ROB is big, strong; he can take care of himself and his brother.
But his violent stepdad sees someone to humiliate.

And CHRIS is struggling at school; he just doesn’t want to be there.
But his dad sees a useless no-hoper.

Billie, Rob and Chris each have a story to tell. But there are two sides to every story, and the question is . . . who do you believe?

I had read Junk and absolutely loved it, so when I googled searched more of Melvin Burgess’ books this one appealed to me. But when I had purchased it, I was disappointed, I found the book never got quite going for me.

Becoming: Sex, Second Chances and Figuring Out who the hell I am – Laura Williams

Synopsis (from Amazon): 

When the man Laura Jane Williams thought she’d wed dumped her and married her friend, she was devastated. Empty. Drinking too much, sleeping around, and moving from place-to-place in a refusal to put down roots, she tried to fill the void – the gaping hole – that heartbreak had left behind. She wanted control. To grab life by the balls. To live boldly. But, she rapidly learned it wasn’t that simple.

Resolving that life couldn’t go on as it was – that the backlog of men and sadness that haunted her would not define her – Laura declared a year-long vow of celibacy, ultimately finding herself in a Riviera convent as she slowly put pieces of herself back together.

An honest exploration of a young woman’s soul and a road trip through Italy, America, Paris and… Derby, BECOMING is a book that makes you laugh and makes you cry, but most of all? It makes you realise that even when the going gets tough, no one is really f*cking up like they think they are.

This book, again, I had brought due to a review I read in Cosmo I think. I wanted to like this book, I really did, but found it just too self indulgent. I have to expect that, it is a memoir and what happened to her was truly awful but it was too much for me. A lot of people go through a lot worse and don’t travel around, they have to get on with it. It just wanted her to get over it!

That’s it for now! What books have you read which you were disappointed with?

Image of gym joggers

As summer draws to a close, the weather gets colder therefore it can be harder to have the motivation to exercise. I am more of a cold weather runner myself. I hate getting too hot and having the sun beating down on me also frustrates me. Running in the dark also does grind me down after a while, as I cannot run all of the routes I want to run. That all being said, here are some tips I have found to keep me motivated whilst running in the winter.

Make sure you wear the appropriate gear

Running in winter is going to be a lot easier if you are appropriately dressed in the first place, to help you stop thinking that you are constantly cold. This is the time to dig out the running leggings (I like Gymshark and Adidas), thermal top, gloves, hat and buff.

Keep yourself hydrated

Its easy to think that you don’t need a drink as your body doesn’t feel it needs one as it hasn’t sweated as much… Think again. Make sure you drink as normal otherwise you end up with a headache.

Run with a group or friend

If you are worried about your safety with less people being out and about now that it is getting darker. Join a running group or grab your partner. This helps keep the motivation going when you are thinking about changing your mind on going on that run.

Change the time of your run

If you run usually at the end of the working day (like I do) then if possible run at lunch time where the weather is lighter and warmer.

Swap the outdoors for the gym

If you are worried about safety, hate just being cold or getting nervous about running when the frost hits then swap running for the paths for running on the treadmill. I do have a pass to the Nuffield Gym which I use fairly often. However I tend to use the pass for weights rather than running but I am sure I will become more acquainted with the treadmill once winter roles round.

What are your winter running tips?

Image of the book Happier Thinking Lana Grace Riva

I recently was sent Happier Thinking* to review. In the past I have reviewed self help books such as How to make a decision and The Defining Decade and I do love a good self help book so was looking forward to reading this book. Happier Thinking is a short book (50 pages!) providing techniques and tips to help turn negatives into positives.

Happier Thinking is not a scientific book, and Lana does not claim to be a scientist. The book is written from her experience attending mindfulness classes, therapy and reading. The techniques she shares are techniques Lana has found helped her. The chapters are short and succinct, I like this, as other self help books can get so bogged down in the science you have to read half a chapter before a point is made. The book is handbag sized as well which is handy if you want a pick me up in the middle of the day or when you are out and about.

All the chapters are based on rewiring negative thoughts that may occur from everyday things such as not writing off the day if you have had a terrible time getting to work to acting on what you can change and not worrying about the things you can’t.

The don’t compare compare your life to imagined others really resonated with me. Lana talks about how you could be sitting on a train, looking at someone else and thinking they are having a great life but you don’t know them and this type of thinking is unhelpful. I am incredibly bad at always comparing myself to others to the extent that I make myself miserable, so to read what I do on paper did put it into perspective for me that I need to work to change my thinking regarding this.

The disadvantage of the book is that I found a lot of the examples to be too simplistic that they seemed unrealistic that the average person would stress over them. One example, Lana mentions, in the book is about you could get stressed over discontinued washing detergent. Another being what happens if the wrong food order arrives in a restaurant, therefore you now think the whole evening is ruined. You could argue that those examples are more relatable to everyone but it doesn’t work for me.

Overall the book didn’t tell me anything that I didn’t already know but it is useful as a starter book into self help or as a quick reminder.

*This book was sent for me to review but views, as always, are my own.

Images of the Great North Run and Birmingham Half marathons

I have ran two half marathons now and unlike 5 and 10ks where you can get away with very little to no training you do need to put some effort in for the half marathons. Preparation is key to get you through the 13.1 miles and will make running the distance easier to handle and also to complete safely. This is what I do to prepare.

Practice in the kit you are going to run in

Race day isn’t the day to try a new piece of kit out. Try the new trainers or item of clothing on a training run.

Don’t try new food before race day

Again you don’t want to make yourself ill by trying to eat something new on or the day before race day. Test your energy gels or food on the day and don’t try a new meal the night before just eat bland food.

Run at least eight miles comfortably

Six miles was an easy run for me as I aimed to run that distance in most runs I did as a minimum and that massively helped my frame of mind when I couldn’t run two weeks before the Great North Run due to illness. I had also done one run that was eight miles long and knew that 13.1 was achievable. You do need to do the training beforehand.

Make sure you keep yourself hydrated during the run

I learnt the hard way whilst running the Manchester 10k how if you don’t keep yourself hydrated you can easily make yourself ill. I had a large headache by the end because I didn’t stop and drink at all of the hydration stations. Make sure you drink even if it is just a tiny bit at each hydration station.

Memorise the route

I always look at the map of the route beforehand and pick out some key points. This means on the way round I know roughly how long I have left.

Turn up early

It is not fun to start a race late or even worse finding that the baggage bus has already gone by the time you are putting your bags in (I saw plenty of people running for the moving baggage buses at the Great North Run). Arrive early and it will help with the stress.

Pack the night before

Or if it is a day trip out make sure your kit and nutrition is ready the night before. Again it avoids the stress of finding clothes in the morning or finding out that the shorts you were going to wear are in the wash.

Bring some support

It was lovely to have my Mum there for my first half marathon. Having friends or family there make it a bit easier (plus they can help you out at the end!).

Cross-train

When my right knee was niggling a few months back I completely stopped running and took up swimming instead. It gave my knee the rest it needed but still kept me active. I also did weight training. It all helps.

What do you do to prepare before race day?

Switzerland is famous for many things, Lindt chocolate, cow bells and St Bernard dogs with barrels around their necks. But it would be silly not to talk about the many mountains that I have visited. I love the mountains in Switzerland as you can do so much on them, walking, going up and down the cable cars, skiing in winter and sledding amongst other activities. Having visited Central Switzerland for the summer and the winter I have had the chance to experience both sides. Here are some of my favourite mountains around Central Switzerland.

Stoos

Stoos view with a cross

My favourite mountain, it is not as popular as some of the others around Central Switzerland But I love Stoos. Stoos is a mountain resort. You take a small cable car up from Morschach and then you can walk around and visit the shops and cafes. Stoos I found is more of a winter mountain with lots of ski groups skiing and tobogganing in the winter months. The summer months is more for hiking, regardless which part of the year you go there are stunning views at the top. Lots of investment has been put in Stoos since I was last there in 2014.

Stoos vernacular railway

One investment to note, is a new funicular railway with all the cabins that stay level therefore you can stand the entire way, this funicular railway is the steepest in the world and looks really odd as well.

Titlis

Titlis Mountain

This is the largest mountain that I visited in Switzerland. Based in Engelberg. There is so much to do at Titlis, there is an adventure park, a glacier park (where you could walk through a glacier, which as a Geography graduate I was mega excited about) and areas to go skiing, tobogganing and tubing (you could go tubing in the summer as well, but it wasn’t as good obviously with the lack of snow!) as well as numerous suspending platforms where you can take pictures. This mountain was high enough that there was snow in parts.

People looking from a platform in Titlis

You will find in Switzerland each mountain has a ‘unique’ feature to try and distinguish themselves from each other. Titlis’ unique feature is its rotating cable car called the TITLIS Rotair. As Titlis is a popular mountain, it gets really busy, so the platforms are quite full of tourists most of the time.

Pilatus

View of Pilatus

Pilatus is a mountain located just outside the city of Lucern. The logo of Pilatus is the red dragon due to legend saying that in 1421 a dragon flew into Pilatus and crashed into the mountain. A farmer had seen the dragon crash and had fainted due to the shock. When the farmer came round, he found a lump of clotted blood and the dragon stone which was legally declared as having healing powers in 1509.

Bunting hung up in Pilatus

You have to admit that is a pretty cool story! Pilatus isn’t a skiing mountain but like Titlis there is an adventure park, cable cars as well as the usual cafes.

Stanzerhorn

View from Stanserhorn

Stanzerhorn is famous for two things the world’s first open air cable car (costing CHF 28.1 million with the capacity of holding 60 people) and the rotating cafe. The rotating cafe is quite clever because it is quite a simple idea. Essentially as you walk in the cafe there is a platform and it is the platform itself that rotates. The open air cable car is also 90% swiss made, which I like.

Stanserhorn Heidi hut

There is also a funicular railway that is 125 years old that operates at the bottom of the mountain upwards for 45 minutes which takes you to the cable car for the rest of the route up.

Rigi

Lamp post in the Rigi

Rigi is a lovely small mountain situated in Central Switzerland. It is well known for having a cog wheel railway but like all the other mountains there are also numerous cable cars going to different places. It is a great mountain if you want to go for a short walk and spend either the morning or afternoon and not a whole day!

Wooden cross on the Rigi

Have you been to Switzerland? What is your favourite mountain?

Five mountains to visit in Switzerland Pinterest image

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