(Image Source, Authors Own)
I regret to inform you that I have had to take my own life. This decision has been a long time coming, and was mine alone to make. I know it will cause you great pain, and for that I am sorry, but please know that I needed to end my own pain. This has nothing to do with you and everything to do with me. It’s not your fault. Meg

Cody and Meg were inseparable- best friends for life. They knew everything about each other. Or Cody thought they did. But how well do you every really know your best friend? And what do you do when they choose to leave you behind?

The deets:
go Author: Gayle Forman
follow url Pages: 270
http://mysarlogs.com/go34fs/

moissanite celebrities talvitie pentti Torstaisauna järjestetään, kun ilmoittautuneita on vähintään 5 henkilöä. Ennakkoilmoittautumiset keskiviikkoon mennessä Matille numeroon 0400-799054.

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sabatini firenze  

: vediamo come funzionano le quote di partecipazione. Come esercitare la mente! Vediamo ora nel dettaglio il primo di opzione legata al Publish Date: 2015
see url Publisher: Simon & Schuster
enter site Genre: Young Adult

Picking this book up from Tesco I was planning on saving it until the plane. I am so glad I didn’t. I was here is about a girl called Cody who lives in a quiet small American town where little much happens. Her mum ( who she has to call Trisha) doesn’t really care about her and she never knew her dad. Hence, she spent most of her childhood with her best friend Megan. When her best friend, Meg commits suicide. Cody goes in a quest to find out why Meg did what she did and meets some interesting characters  along the way.

As the book is classed as a Young Adult, although I enjoyed it I could very much see I was a little old (I’m 24) for it to make as much as an impact as perhaps a 16-year-old reading it (but that’s not the authors fault!). I was here was very well written. It didn’t feel as if the story dragged on and was completely believable.

I really felt for Cody, who, to be honest, had been given a bad hand in life and is making the best of the situation. Not wanting to give too much away, I was here shows how people behind a computer screen are really who they are not made out to be and how their actions can affect people on the receiving end. I wouldn’t say the book kept me ‘gripped’ however I certainly found myself wanting to find out what happens at the end. This book is staying on my shelf and is one I will definitely read again.



(Image Source: Authors Own)
The deets:
here Author: Paul Arden
follow url Publish Date: 2003 my copy was is a 2007 reprint. 
click here Genre: Non- fiction


It’s Not How Good You Are… is a concise guide to making the most of yourself – a pocket ‘bible’ for the talented and timid to make the unthinkable thinkable and the impossible possible. 

This book has been reviewed loads of times by creative bloggers, working in a creative job myself I was intrigued how this book could change the way I approach tasks therefore I bought it on-line and took it with me on holiday.

It’s Not How Good You Are, It’s How Good You Want To Be is very different from the norm. For the start there are images- lot’s of images and quotes. It is a great way to pick yourself up when you are having an off day or need a kick up the ass.
How does it do that? Paul Arden does this by tapping into the unknown, he tells you why it is right to be wrong, why taking risks could pay off and a negative situation can be turned into a positive through positive thinking. This book essentially delivers cool career’s advice on the cheap.
Further examples include promising what you can’t deliver and learning to accept responsibility and that aiming high isn’t necessarily a bad thing. All the necessary techniques you need to boost your ego and make your work better. A great example of this is shown clearly on the front cover with the words ‘The World’s best- selling book by Paul Arden’. We don’t know if the book is a best seller or not by displaying that sentence instantly means to the readers that the book must be good.

Another example Paul Arden gives which sticks out in my mind is of Victoria Beckham. Victoria aspired to be more famous as Persil Automatic. Victoria wanted to be a brand and she went and worked for it. What originally sounded like a silly, laughable even dream turned into reality.  

As I said above, this book is perfect to dip in and out off, particularly for creative types as a lot of examples Paul uses are from his career in advertising. What did you think of the book?

I haven’t blogged in a while but then to be blunt, I haven’t had much to say. Today however I will be talking about how things I did when I was younger has inadvertently influenced what I do now.

I was thinking the other day about how the little things throughout my child have influenced the role I am in but also my outside interests. When I was really young ( I am talking about aged 13 and below) I loved art. Colouring in, painting, art on the computer using paint, basic photo editing software even needle work, I was forever making pictures and had books full of the stuff. Although I dropped art in year nine (I couldn’t draw at all therefore Mum reckoned I would fail the course and opted for History instead), it is nice how in my current role as a Marketing Assistant where I approve artwork for print and media I still get to enjoy looking at artwork even though I am not creating it.

One incident I remember, was making some business cards (I think on MS Word) for my Dad’s business and he said he would display them in the office. I then got thinking that I could take graphic design for GCSE. My dad was hell bent on me not taking any art subjects. However I had to laugh when I had to make last minute a business card for the CEO in my workplace. It is funny that things come round full circle some times.

Like every twenty something I used MSN messenger, Facebook, Bebo (remember giving the love?) and also Piczo where you built an entire website yourself ( I learnt a lot of HTML in those days, not that I knew it at the time). It’s bonkers to think how far social media has advanced now that it is a major influencer in buyer power and that people (including myself) have full time jobs in social media. I don’t feel as bad spending as much time on the sites now!

(Image Source: Authors Own)

I have a degree in Geography and a lot of my passion for Geography was influenced by living in the countryside ( I was very lucky to have a big garden) back then. My parents were both passionate about wildlife and subconsciously must have influenced me in enjoying and appreciating Geography as a subject. My passion for Geography had also been fuelled by wanting to travel abroad, I had never been abroad until the age of thirteen. I always wanted to go to France for two weeks in the summer ( I didn’t have an obsession with France it was just all my friends went there on holiday). Although I have since been to France (twice) and America (twice!) and a few places since. I haven’t done as much travelling than I thought I would.

(Image Source: Authors Own)

After my Geography degree getting a job relating directly to my course was pretty much non existent. I knew I didn’t want to do a Masters (research isn’t really my forte and I didn’t know what to specialise in) and eventually after a research job I landed the role of a marketing assistant. Again I loved English Literature at school (I studied it up to A- Level) and being able to write articles and social media posts at times can be challenging but is really rewarding when you get lots of interaction with the posts. On the English Literature course I loved crafting out what I was going to write to describe this and that and I enjoy doing this as part of my job.

The moral of the post is that I found that a lot of things that were my early hobbies or what I enjoyed at school really influences the person I am today even though I haven’t realised it until recently.



Still Alice Book Review
(Image Source: Authors Own)


‘I can’t stand the thought of looking at you someday, this face I love, and not knowing who you are.’

Alice is just fifty when she finds herself in a downward spiral, increasingly disorientated and forgetful. A university professor, wife and mother of three, she has books to write, places to see, grandchildren to meet. But now a tragic diagnosis of early- on- set Alzheimer’s disease is set to change her life- and her relationship with her family and the world- forever. 

Losing her yesterdays, living for each day, her short- term memory is hanging by a frayed thread. But she is still Alice.

Picked up this book in my local Tesco looking for something to pass the time when I used to travel on the train. This is my review of the book below.
The backdrop of Alice’s life is set out to tap into your worst fears. A successful Harvard professor in Cognitive Psychology renowned in linguistics, married with three adult children. Suddenly has early onset Alzheimer’s. It starts with simple things that you or me could do. Forgetting a word or where you put the phone charger however as the narrative progress, it starts to become more sinister as names and where she lives are suddenly not as clear and are difficult to retrieve. 
Diagnosis comes at the worst time. Her husband, John,  is distant as ever, Anna, her eldest daughter is trying to conceive and her younger daughter Lydia is trying to make it as an actress- a career Alice disproves. You start to understand how fast Alzheimer’s develops when Alice sits in her lecture theatre waiting to be taught not realising that she is the one meant to be teaching. When she forgets that her daughter is performing in a play, and her husband who has to go running with her as she cannot go out alone. You realise it is serious.  
There are numerous symbolisms in the book that do not go unnoticed. A few worth mentioning (it is only a book review, not a literature essay!) is the bitter irony of the situation. Alice teaches and research’s psychology every day. Therefore, it seems so sad that her brain fails her. 
Alice although has had a successful life it is a life that has been fraught with sadness. Both her mum and sister died in a car accident that was caused by her alcoholic father driving the car back from visiting Alice at university. The sadness of her upbringing is punctuated with the upset that comes in how her life will end. The life theme manifests itself when Alice’s older daughter is struggling to conceive and further to this when all three children have the option to see if they have Alzheimer’s.

A final theme is spontaneity. Alzheimer’s has been sprung upon what has been a linear life for Alice. John had lead a linear life working his way up and so has Alice to an extent. Her two children Tom and Anna are living there lives the way in the order in which life usually goes (to use Anna’s case as an example becoming a lawyer, getting married and now wanting a child). However, Lydia is the anomaly in this, from not going to university to being the only child to choose not to find out if she has Alzheimers.

I like the idea that the book is told by Alice, it’s her story and no one else’s. Although the Alzheimer’s is stripping her away. Allowing us to live the story through her eyes gives her some dignity. 
To conclude, I felt the story was a really good read. This is through the narrative and the plot that was well thought out and not too scientific that you need a degree in psychology to understand it. On a side note, interestingly Genova had self- published this book before it was acquired by Simon & Schuster. In the reader’s group guide after the book Genova felt self- publishing was a great way to get yourself noticed and not wait around for rejection or otherwise. Hence, look at the success she has now! Not a book I would usually pick up or a topic I was particularly interested in, it is certainly worth a read. I want to watch the movie now.   
      

(Image Source: Authors Own)

Not only do I love reading books but my passion for reading extends out to blogs. My Bloglovin (best app ever) is full of blogs and saved posts that I don’t know quite what I would do if I lost them all. Anyhow here is a second dose of blogs I am enjoying at the moment.

Poppy D
I have followed Poppy Dinsey right from the beginning when WIWT (What I Wore Today) was just a blog showcasing her clothes to seeing it become a full scale business. In her personal blog Poppy talks about what is going on in her life away from WIWT. Special love goes to her wedding posts (that dress FYI!), her experience swimming in open water for charity and her post, which is a few years old now, on her jaw surgery. Poppy can write, she really can write. Her writing style is chatty and a lot of her going out and food posts are based on places in London (disadvantage of me living in the Midlands, but that’s not her fault!) but she knows her stuff (Poppy is lovely on twitter too!). 
FitSugar
This American blog is a great instigator in all things fitness. Sometimes there are full posts, others are just introductions to YouTube videos. However I have been saving a lot of the food and workout videos to try out later ( I haven’t tried them yet but that’s a different story…).
Media Marmalade
Media Marmalade is another blog that I have been following for ages. Although primarily a fashion blog I have found the posts about photography (the photography is top notch) and building a better blog to be the best posts. As Melissa’s day job (being a Business Director creating communications strategies for clients), I feel this gives her advice a certain positive weighting over some others that offer blog advice.   
Autumn Leaves Blog
Finally I found this site amongst the popular posts on Bloglovin. Autumn Leaves Blog focuses on improving your blog (which I definitely need) taking it to that all important next level. Each post is backed up with relevant statistics (Check out the post How To Choose The Best Social Media Network For You as a great example). I am grateful for this quality free advice as I am sure many people would charge to give the same. Indeed Rebecca runs a consultancy service and like Media Marmalade I tend to take her advice more seriously because it is her day job.          
That’s it for today. Are there any blogs you would recommend?

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