Image of gym joggers

As summer draws to a close, the weather gets colder therefore it can be harder to have the motivation to exercise. I am more of a cold weather runner myself. I hate getting too hot and having the sun beating down on me also frustrates me. Running in the dark also does grind me down after a while, as I cannot run all of the routes I want to run. That all being said, here are some tips I have found to keep me motivated whilst running in the winter.

Make sure you wear the appropriate gear

Running in winter is going to be a lot easier if you are appropriately dressed in the first place, to help you stop thinking that you are constantly cold. This is the time to dig out the running leggings (I like Gymshark and Adidas), thermal top, gloves, hat and buff.

Keep yourself hydrated

Its easy to think that you don’t need a drink as your body doesn’t feel it needs one as it hasn’t sweated as much… Think again. Make sure you drink as normal otherwise you end up with a headache.

Run with a group or friend

If you are worried about your safety with less people being out and about now that it is getting darker. Join a running group or grab your partner. This helps keep the motivation going when you are thinking about changing your mind on going on that run.

Change the time of your run

If you run usually at the end of the working day (like I do) then if possible run at lunch time where the weather is lighter and warmer.

Swap the outdoors for the gym

If you are worried about safety, hate just being cold or getting nervous about running when the frost hits then swap running for the paths for running on the treadmill. I do have a pass to the Nuffield Gym which I use fairly often. However I tend to use the pass for weights rather than running but I am sure I will become more acquainted with the treadmill once winter roles round.

What are your winter running tips?

Images of the Great North Run and Birmingham Half marathons

I have ran two half marathons now and unlike 5 and 10ks where you can get away with very little to no training you do need to put some effort in for the half marathons. Preparation is key to get you through the 13.1 miles and will make running the distance easier to handle and also to complete safely. This is what I do to prepare.

Practice in the kit you are going to run in

Race day isn’t the day to try a new piece of kit out. Try the new trainers or item of clothing on a training run.

Don’t try new food before race day

Again you don’t want to make yourself ill by trying to eat something new on or the day before race day. Test your energy gels or food on the day and don’t try a new meal the night before just eat bland food.

Run at least eight miles comfortably

Six miles was an easy run for me as I aimed to run that distance in most runs I did as a minimum and that massively helped my frame of mind when I couldn’t run two weeks before the Great North Run due to illness. I had also done one run that was eight miles long and knew that 13.1 was achievable. You do need to do the training beforehand.

Make sure you keep yourself hydrated during the run

I learnt the hard way whilst running the Manchester 10k how if you don’t keep yourself hydrated you can easily make yourself ill. I had a large headache by the end because I didn’t stop and drink at all of the hydration stations. Make sure you drink even if it is just a tiny bit at each hydration station.

Memorise the route

I always look at the map of the route beforehand and pick out some key points. This means on the way round I know roughly how long I have left.

Turn up early

It is not fun to start a race late or even worse finding that the baggage bus has already gone by the time you are putting your bags in (I saw plenty of people running for the moving baggage buses at the Great North Run). Arrive early and it will help with the stress.

Pack the night before

Or if it is a day trip out make sure your kit and nutrition is ready the night before. Again it avoids the stress of finding clothes in the morning or finding out that the shorts you were going to wear are in the wash.

Bring some support

It was lovely to have my Mum there for my first half marathon. Having friends or family there make it a bit easier (plus they can help you out at the end!).

Cross-train

When my right knee was niggling a few months back I completely stopped running and took up swimming instead. It gave my knee the rest it needed but still kept me active. I also did weight training. It all helps.

What do you do to prepare before race day?

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